I don’t do crossroads, I do corners

After what seems to be years, but in reality is just a few months, I finally have finally seemed to turn a corner. Getting to crossroads tends to suggest two options from which to choose but I’ve never been in that position, I’ve always been on the right side of the path but sometimes I turn round the wrong corners.

Recent crises have left me feeling fragmented and helpless and I don’t cope particularly well with either state. I have had unfailing support from a small circle of friends and family who have helped me whether they knew it or not.

I knew I’d turned a corner when I did some ironing today and that I knew when to stop. Too many times I tell myself that one more item won’t matter but it usually does mean the difference between tears or tantrums and sometimes both.

I got the hoover out and did the living room and the kitchen and that felt as though I’d regained a little more control over my life. I don’t like doing housework but when it’s as tidy as it can be it’s a long way of the chaos that it can be in a matter of days.

I’ve not done too well on the eating side of things but I did at least stop for a cheese sandwich at lunchtime and there will be fish finger, chips and peas for tea. Not brilliant but not disastrous either.

I’ve just realised that from starting the above paragraph and finishing it I came to the conclusion that I’ve done quite well. It becomes more obvious how well I have managed when I see things on a page. It’s very important for me to write things down. When I post my blog it doesn’t matter if it never gets read by anyone else (though people do read it and identify with it) but I write regardless because it clears my head and carves a path through the debris and detritus that’s hanging around my brain.

The most important thing that I’ve learned in these weeks and months is that acceptance isn’t a final stage. I accept that I have an illness that makes a huge impact on my life and that impact could, and probably will, make me become more severely affected. Bipolar disorder doesn’t go away and unless there is a miracle cure then how I am now is the way I will always  be and I have to live with.

I will never stop railing against it. I will never stop exhausting myself or burning myself into the ground just by doing the normal kind of things that normal kind of people do. I will always do the outrageous thing than the safe thing. I will always strive to get to a stage where I cope with this bloody awful illness instead of just managing it hour by bloody hour.

I’m not any of the descriptions that people trot out in memes. I haven’t got a mental health problem because I’m a strong person who’s been fighting too long, I’m a strong person with a mental health problem and I’m living with it not fighting it. There are days when I’m fed up and I can’t imagine living this life a moment longer but I am the semicolon and not the full stop; I know that there is a life for me if I just pause. It is not the life that 14 year old me imagined for herself but it hasn’t been a bad life, it’s been an interesting life. There’s been lots of hilarious moments, too many stupid ones and so many outrageous ones that I’ve lost count.

That life will continue. I am 59 this year and I have been living with bipolar since early adolescence – onset at 13 or 14, diagnosable at 16 or 17 but not diagnosed until I was until I was 36. I am, at times, as old as 27 in my head but I’m usually a reckless 18.

I have many talents though I would dearly love to improve both my writing and my photography because even though I’ve had pieces of each published professionally I don’t think that you ever get as good as you can be. I will leave you with the quote below which I believe the coach of the England squad said in a Rugby World Cup about how the team strived to win.

The greatest sin you can ever commit is to grow old without knowing just how good you could have been.